At the Coalface

At the Coalface

At the Coalface

“At the Coalface” documents the work of Arts Recovery Project Officer, Marilyn Gourley, who works with fire-affected communities to foster arts projects and support artists through the process of rebuilding. The film follows the stages of recovery through the seasons, and explores the community’s creative response in parallel with the transforming landscape.

 

“At the Coalface” was conceived, directed and produced by one of Regional Arts Victoria’s Regional Arts Development Officers, Verity Higgins and captured by filmmaker David Brown.

 

“At The Coalface” was produced with assistance from VicHealth.

Supporting the Supporters

Supporting the Supporters

How do we support those people working hard to support long term recovery often whilst impacted themselves?

 

This resource website is a great practical guide for those who have a role supporting the long term post – disaster recovery in communities. It is useful in giving overview and detail to support understanding the needs, impetus and necessity to look after yourself and each other through the recovery journey. Whilst focusing on workforce it is useful for communities in the planning and establishment of support mechanisms for community-led recovery programs.

 

The author, Jolie Willis was awarded a Winston Churchill Fellowship to study how best to support the workforce resilience of those working in prolonged stress. Jolie is a cognitive scientist (Masters degree in cognitive psychology) specialising in mass disruption and disaster recovery. Her area of interest is how the mind works under prolonged pressure, how we make decisions and how our reactions and behaviours are impacted by stress.

 

Jolie developed and led the psychosocial recovery programming following the Christchurch earthquakes for New Zealand Red Cross before becoming the National Psychosocial Advisor and led the support for the bereaved families in Christchurch. Jolie has been collating lessons learned from disasters around the world and supporting recovery capacity building and recovery in action.
 
Arts Reside Here

Arts Reside Here

 

‘The arts’ come in many guises and play diverse roles in remote, rural and regional communities. To explore this in more depth, FRRR received support from the H&L Hecht Trust to undertake the Art Resides Here project. Authentic community voices and stories from five Victorian communities were captured by Julie Millowick, photographer, photo-journalist and creative producer.

Each community had engaged with the arts in a different way and for different purposes, and over the years, each had been supported by FRRR to deliver arts-based projects. Their stories were shared at Artlands Victoria in October 2018, and the beautiful photos and words from the community have now been published in a book. Hard copies are now in communities, and copies have also been sent to local libraries in the featured towns, as well as the National Library.

This is a great advocacy tool for the power and place of culture and the arts in disaster management.

Our Stories – Beyond the Disaster

Our Stories – Beyond the Disaster

Our Stories – Beyond the Disaster 2021

This report was released in 2021 by the National Mental Health Commission as part of the national framework for responding to mental health and wellbeing issues following a disaster.

The report, entitled Our Stories – Beyond the Disaster, was conducted with 26 participants from two natural disaster settings: 12 people from the Eurobodalla and Bega Valley communities who were significantly impacted by the 2019/20 bushfires; and 14 people affected by 2019 monsoon flooding in Townsville and North West Queensland.

The project gathered stories from people who had lived through natural disaster and also looked into individual, family and community responses to find out how local challenges and adaptations can be implemented on a national level.

The recommendations focus on services working with disaster management and call for trauma-informed  human-focused support, with points that could be highlighted to support creative process and programs.

This report forms the basis for the development of the National Disaster Mental Health and Wellbeing Framework.

 

Regeneration – Little Pocket, Beechmont Qld

Regeneration – Little Pocket, Beechmont Qld

The Little Pocket is a grassroots organisation based in Beechmont Qld with community and the natural environment at their core. In response to the Sarabah Wildfire of 2019/20 Regeneration was established to gently facilitate a meaningful creative process that builds community connections, capacity and resilience through courageous conversations, sharing of stories and community-engaged creative practice. A range of creative projects evolved to build community connection, creating space for recovery, regeneration and resilience,

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